“Stories are the connective tissue of the human race. At the heart of every issue is a human element that leads to the three most beautiful words in the English language: ‘What happened next?’ If you answer that question, you are a storyteller.”

—Katherine Lanpher

About the brand

Writing and photography that inspires women and non-binary identifying people of all backgrounds to recognize their own innate creativity, courage, and resilience.

This is a place to find inclusive storytelling where multicultural families and communities can see their worlds reflected back to them with honesty and grace.

women and non-binary folks together celebrating unity, Eq Tennant brand mission

Core Values

Timeless

What do we mean: stands the test of time, evergreen not trendy, foundation, quality and integrity.

Why is this important: the work is universal, people can find anyone, they will find themselves in it and resonate.

Community

The stories she tells are always based on the relationships people build, whether it is the family they are born into or they choose. About humanity and knowing our own human connection. Being mindful of how each of us plays a role.

Fun

What do we mean: stands the test of time, evergreen not trendy, foundation, quality and integrity.

Why is this important: the work is universal, people can find anyone, they will find themselves in it and resonate.

This is a creative safe space to read & share stories...

We are:

We are a woman-owned creative company.

We are inclusive.

We are creative.

We are bold and brave.

We are creating space for storytellers of all backgrounds.

We are not:

We are not elite.

We are not perfectionists.

We are not bound to rules of literature.

We are not gender exclusive.

We are not invisible.

About Me

Philippino girl with her first camera and writing her first project. Story of Eva Q. Tennant writer and Photographer

My Dad gave me my first camera — a hand-me-down pocket Kodak Instamatic — when I was 11 years old before he entrusted me with his Polaroid then Zeiss Icon Contaflex as my skills and interest grew. About the same time (to my delight and embarrassment in equal measure), my teacher Linda Lewis hung my creative writing on the class bulletin board. I’ve been telling stories ever since, through words and images.

In short order, I held positions as a school newspaper editor, photography editor, beat reporter, and ran my own darkroom by the time I was an undergraduate journalism student at the University of Maryland in the late 1980s. My career track in communications followed thereafter, where I climbed the ranks as a copy editor, production editor, managing editor, creative services and marketing director at publishing, nonprofit associations, and higher education organizations.

University of Maryland photo by Stephanie S. Cordle, Maryland Today 2020
Author and photographer Eva Q. Tennant

This was not the path that my immigrant parents had envisioned for me. Their hope was that I follow in my mother’s footsteps into medicine like my eldest sister did, something that could secure my financial independence that they had worked so hard to do themselves. But my parents came to understand and accept my proclivity toward storytelling — through a camera lens or through my writing.

Today, I lead a marketing and communications team at a state university, providing students a chance to learn real-world skills in our creative studio environment that will take them not only beyond the classroom, but also beyond graduation. Under my tenure, we have captured numerous national awards for excellence in marketing design. It is also here that I found my way back to my first loves of creative writing, with an opportunity to return to graduate studies in 2016 after decades of working as a communications professional.

Author and photographer Eva Q. Tennant
women and non-binary folks together celebrating unity, Eq Tennant brand mission

turning point

Given the choice between an MBA or an MFA, I chose to pursue the latter, completing a three-year Creative Writing and Publishing Arts program at the University of Baltimore, an HBCU in the heart of Charm City.

There I discovered a vibrant and diverse community committed to the singular mission to support writers in finding their voices, honing their cra. There I discovered a love and appreciation of learning, particularly as an older working adult, which I never could have had as a young undergraduate so many years ago.

Search for Stories of Heritage

My thesis work at UB culminated in a book collection of 11 short stories (fiction and flash fiction) that I wrote, edited, type set, designed, and photographed. Three years of focused writing, workshop revision, and creativity resulted in this body of work that explores three generations of Filipino-American characters after World War II. The book explores the ties that bind family — whether the family you’re born into or the family that you make. It’s about sacrifice, surviving loss and betrayal; discovering one’s identity; and moving forward to an uncertain future.

Although a work of fiction, my book is inspired and informed by the real lived experiences of close friends and my own family — stories of our collective Filipinio-American heritage that I had not seen reflected back to me in the literature I had read. The process included extensive research in familial genealogy, history of the Philippines, Filipino politics, geography, American warfare, gender identity, and more.

During my coursework at the University of Baltimore, I also studied higher education pedagogy, discourse communities, and teaching writing along with graduate-level critical analysis of literary master works as well as peer learning through workshop critiques in poetry, memoir, and fiction. I also served as the president of the graduate student-run organization, Plork Press, and received the Plork Award, granted by the MFA program, which “honors a graduate student whose work best exemplifies the spirit of the MFA program, exhibiting extraordinary creativity, originality and imagination in the integration of creative writing and book design.”

Never Too Late to Learn

The whole graduate school experience gave me the confidence that I could immerse myself in disciplined learning while working full-time — that pursuing an advanced degree was something I could indeed achieve at my age and stage of life. Not only did it re-invigorate my thirst for continuous learning, but I was also able to discover and build upon skills; and perhaps more importantly, helped me to establish a diverse network of writers and professors with whom I will continue to be in relationship.

writer just finishing her page, ink pen on top of paper
Philippino children playing and laughing, memories of Eva Q. Tennant write and photographer
pain of the littlest finger book cover written by eq tennant

Goals of this website

The intersection of words and photographs to tell stories, share universal truths, uncover collective struggles of feeling different, yet also celebrate those differences is the primary goal of this space.

My hope is that these pages will become full of not only my works, my reflections of the world, but also those of other storytellers who can inspire emerging artists of all ages to find their own way, their own voice to tell their stories. We are here to make connections, build community

website goals women celebrating

Get a copy of my book

pain of the littlest finger book cover written by eq tennant

Copyright 2019-2024, Eva Quintos Tennant, all rights reserved.

Pain of the Littlest Finger

Collection of 11 short stories (fiction and flash fiction) that I wrote, edited, typeset, photographed, and designed from cover-to-cover as my final thesis project at the MFA Creative Writing & Publishing Arts program at the University of Baltimore. Three years of focused writing, workshop revision, and creativity culminated in this body of work that explores three generations of Filipino-American characters after World War II.

It explores the ties that bind family — whether the family you’re born into or the family that you make. It’s about sacrifice, surviving loss and betrayal; discovering one’s identity; and moving forward to an uncertain future. Historical backdrop settings include Luzon, Philippines; New York City; Washington, DC. and Annapolis, MD. Although a work of fiction, the stories are inspired by the real lives of people who overcame war, poverty, domestic abuse, gender identity and racism to build a place they can call home.

Let’s keep in touch!

Calling all Creatives! Join our newsletter where writers and visual storytellers like you will find a diverse and inclusive community sharing inspiration, tips, book recommendations, artist interviews, and much more. Whether you are aspiring or established, you can find a creative home here..

Eva writing with ink feather pen on her notebook